Skip to main content

Axiomatic Panbiogeography

offers an application of incidence geometry to historical biogeography by defining collection localities as points, tracks as lines and generalized tracks as planes.
Home
About Us
Contact Us
Site Map
Member Login
Incidence Geometry
Composite Construction
Orthogenesis
Quaternion Algebraic Geom
Vicariance
Primate Vicariances
Individual Track Construc
Generalized Tracks
Taxogeny
Nodes
Edges
Distributions
Propositions
CREADer
Areas
Main Massings
Geology
Track Analysis and MetaCo
Martitrack Panbiogeograph
Applications
Work
Work A
Work E
Work F
Work B
Hyper Graph Creation
Replies to Criticism
Multimodel Selection
Search Encounter
Cenomanian
TinkerPopPanbiogeography
Track Analysis beyond Pan

Henderson's (node - anti node) empirics
Henderson, I. M. 1990. Quantitative panbiogeography: an investigation into concepts and methods.
     New Zealand Journal of Zoology 16: 495-510.


 






 implies something like the following below:




This is a notion that is not possible for comparative biogeographers - no name would be given -- instead the entire area would receive a name!


 

"Cox (1998) overlooked 'antinode' as a new panbiogeographic term introduced by Henderson (1990, 1991) referring to points where the number of terminal track ..."
Whatever "unitary geographical area" is to mean it could only be ascertained if both the mass and node-antinodes are already considered. Thus consistent application would already have applied.

John Grehan introduces a simplified notion of "dispersal" (Croizat's dispersal from what dispersal) which suggests different ideas about anti-nodes.



"A third new term was introduced by Henderson in 1990: "antinode." Antinodes "identify geographical centers of significant absence of taxa that may also be informative for track analysis." Sometimes, the absence of species or groups is just as important as the presence of species or groups."W03p02-figure-1